Crossing the Veil

Crossing the Veil encourages and engages the audience to take a journey about understanding and dealing with change, to spark emotional memories and discussion about their past or current situation(s). 

The design responds to the critical status of the mental health crisis the world has been facing since 2018, with a large proportion of cases engaging with change and patients unable to take the first step towards recovery and growth.

The design takes common stages of change taken from real life events such as bushfires, life events, natural disasters and more, where the catalyst event lasts a moment whereas the outcome has a lasting impact on a person. Crossing the Veil creates a series of spaces that represent the stages of change and provides a choice for the audience to take a step and cross the threshold to either help heal, grow, or understand the presence of change.



A series of spaces that represent the stages of change and provides a choice for the audience to take a step and cross the threshold to either help heal, grow, or understand the presence of change

Competition Introduction

Crossing the Veil takes an organic form that grows and expands, a poetic representation of how natural change is and how it can lead to growth and/or healing. The pavilion has spaces designed around the stages of change and emulates the associated emotions and feeling to that stage.

The spaces can be interpreted differently and the journey that person takes will be unique to them. An example is the catalyst moment, for most, it would be seeing the object and contemplating their decision to cross the threshold. The false opening is another space intended to make people take the wrong step but understand where they need to go. The journey is a tight space inspired by ravine pathways with light and hope at the end. The main chamber contrast the previous spaces to become a relief space for the audience to take a moment.

Lastly Crossing the Veil acknowledges that some people want or need to avoid crossing that threshold. The exterior space has a space that allows the audience to relax comfortably but feel uneasy due to the presence of the object a representation of the weight and burden of that challenge.